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Beijing’s Missile in Tibet, & Hainan Naval base scare Delhi: Dramatic rise in India-China tensions


By: Moin Ansari | RupeeNews

The Chinese Red dragon’s reach has scared the pants off the Indian elephant. Many have predicted a war between India and China within the next few years. Some called that prediction alarmist. First there were repeated statements from Delhi that China was their biggest enemy and threat. Then news stories that China has built a huge infrastructure on the undefined and undemarcated Mcmohan line (the de factor border between India and China). Now the escalating tensions are sounding alarm bells around the world. The Federation of American Scientist has just published pictures of Chinese missiles which can target all of India. The incompetent intelligence agencies of India didn’t have a clue about the missiles. Any high school drop out could have paid a a commercial satellite a nickel and gotten the pictures of the satellites. The fact that the FAS pictures has so unnerved Delhi that it has decided to form to new intelligence agencies is a subject of much discussion around the world

Analysis of new commercial satellite photos has identified an extensive deployment area with nearly 60 launch pads for medium-range nuclear ballistic missiles in Central China near Delingha and Da Qaidam.

The region has long been rumored to house nuclear missiles and I have previously described some of the facilities in a report and a blog. But the new analysis reveals a significantly larger deployment area than previously known, different types of launch pads, command and control facilities, and missile deployment equipment at a large facility in downtown Delingha.

The U.S. government often highlights China’s deployment of new mobile missiles as a concern but keeps the details secret, so the discovery of the deployment area provides the first opportunity for the public to better understand how China operates its mobile ballistic missiles. FAS Security

The Peoples Republic of China possesses one of the largest land-based missile forces on the planet. The Chinese plan never aimed for ICMB parity with the US or Russia the  rapid growth of a modern 2nd Artillery Corps has created a very potent deterrent force for Beijing. China’s missiles are capable of inundating the region surrounding China with  thousands, of conventional and nuclear armed missiles. The Peoples Liberation Army’s 2nd Artillery Corps is now recognized as one of the most devastating military branches found in any military worldwide.

NEW DELHI: Stung by China’s aggressive posturing, including its deployment of missiles in Delingha near Tibet, and other increasingly hostile activities in India’s neighbourhood, the Cabinet Committee on Security is considering a proposal to set up separate centres for nuclear or missile intelligence and maritime security. In fact, with strong backing by National Security Advisor M K Narayanan, the CCS, which is still smarting under the Chinese `aggression’, is all set to give the go-ahead to the proposal.

From Delingha the DF-21 is in range of northern India and three Russian ICBM fields and a bomber base. Photo Courtesy: FAS

From Delingha the DF-21 is in range of northern India and three Russian ICBM fields and a bomber base. Photo Courtesy: FAS

The inability of central intelligence agencies like RAW, DIA and IB in keeping a tab on recent deployment of intermediate range missiles like DF-4 and reports that Beijing might station ICBMs in the Delingha region seem to have alarmed authorities into action. The medium-range ballistic missiles which are already deployed in Delingha can hit targets that are almost 3,000 kilometres away. China has also built several launch pads for nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles in the same region.

“The entire northern India and parts of central India can be hit from there. The way these missiles have been deployed, they can only hit four countries — Nepal, Pakistan, Myanmar and India. And because the other three countries are not potential adversaries of China, there is obviously deep concern here about China’s intentions and you can say that this is one way of addressing this concern,” said a source, adding that the separate centres for missile and maritime intelligence will initially comprise officers from central intelligence agencies. Till now, the Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC) has worked as the nodal agency responsible for the functioning of all internal and external intelligence agencies.

A security official admitted that the need for separate missile intelligence centres was primarily because of China’s expanding missile development programme. The new agency will not just gather information but also analyse information available with central agencies like DIA, RAW, IB and NTRO and recommend action to counter any adverse development.

An increase in deployed DF-21 medium-range ballistic missiles is reported by the Pentagon. Commercial satellite images in 2007 indicated possible DF-21 deployment at Delingha in the northern parts of Central China.

An increase in deployed DF-21 medium-range ballistic missiles is reported by the Pentagon. Commercial satellite images in 2007 indicated possible DF-21 deployment at Delingha in the northern parts of Central China.

“This agency, once it comes into being, will deal exclusively with nuclear and missile intelligence. The agencies carrying out this work now function under the JIC but the committee is not exclusively for missile and nuclear intelligence,” he added. The new agency will function directly under the National Security Council and will be accountable for all inputs from the neighbouring region on developments related to missile and nuclear technology.

This proposal was first mooted by a joint task force on intelligence headed by former JIC chief S D Pradhan. Two other members of the task force are former IB director P C Haldar and scientist Roddam Narasimha. The task force was constituted at the behest of Narayanan himself and it has submitted its report to the government.


Delingha missiles base in Tibet China

Delingha  missiles base in Tibet China

Similarly, a separate centre for maritime intelligence is also likely to be cleared by CCS. This centre will work as pivot around which all intelligence agencies involved in maritime security will function. Intel centres to keep tabs on China’s missiles, navy. Sachin Parashar, TNN 18 July 2009, 02:41am IST

The PLA’s  land-based ballistic and cruise missile force consists of 38 operational missile units spread throughout the country. The missile force is heavily oriented towards mobile short and theater range systems, with only eight facilities supporting ICBMs. This lethal mix of missiles now threatens an almost defenseless Delhi whose missiles don’t really work, and whose nuclear explosions are the subject of much doubt and debate even inside Bharat.

Two weeks after photographs of China’s nuclear submarines set alarm bells ringing for the Indian authorities, a commercial satellite has revealed a launching site for over 50 nuclear ballistic missiles, capable of striking all north Indian cities.

According to commercial satellite images analysed by the Federation of American Scientists (FAS), China has significantly reorganized the launching facilities near Delingha in the northern parts of Central China, said Hans Kristensen, a researcher with FAS.

The medium-range missiles also have Russia within striking range.

“From these launch pads for DF-21 missiles, southern Russia and northern India would be within range, but not Japan, Taiwan or Guam,” Kristensen added.

The DF-21 is a medium-range ballistic missile estimated by the US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) to have a range of approximately 1,330 miles (2,150 kilometers). It is China’s first solid-fuel ballistic missile and believed to carry a single warhead with a yield of 200-300 kilo-tonnes.

“The US government often highlights China’s deployment of new mobile missiles as a concern but keeps the details secret, so the discovery of the deployment area provides the first opportunity for the public to better understand how China operates its mobile ballistic missiles,” Kristensen said.

The revelation has come two weeks after satellite images of the Chinese Navy’s upcoming base at Hainan Island, 1,200 nautical miles from the strategic Malacca Strait and an access route to the Indian Ocean, has set off alarm bells across the Indian establishment.

The latest images were posted along with Kristensen’s analysis on the website of the Federation of American Scientists. Kristensen said the imagery revealed missile launch sites along a 275-kilometer (170 miles) stretch of highway leading from the city of Delingha through Da Qaidam to Mahai in the northern part of Qinghai province.

Thirty-six launch pads were arrayed in three strings extending north of the highway and west of Delingha. Another 22 launch pads were detected in an area running west of Da Qaidam to Mahai, according to Kristensen’s analysis. newsx.com/story/9976. Chinese nuclear missile base has north India in sight, Fri-May 16, 2008, New Delhi / NewsX Bureau with IANS inputs

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